(Los Angeles, CA) "Superman Returns" composer/editor John Ottman reteams with director Bryan Singer on his World War II film "Valkyrie." Ottman again does double duty as both editor and composer for MGM's "Valkyrie," starring Tom Cruise as a German officer (in theatres December 26). Ottman will again join forces with Singer to score the upcoming film "Superman: Man of Steel;" Ottman has written the scores for and edited nearly all of "Superman" director Bryan Singer's films including "The Usual Suspects" and "Apt Pupil."

The score to "Valkyrie" marks a high point in Ottman's unique career.  Ottman's score is highly effective and avoids the cliches associated with a WWII story. This was done by blending carefully designed electronic sounds with the orchestra. When he couldn't find the right textures, Ottman manipulated his own voice to create them.  Like his heralded score to "The Usual Suspects," Ottman's music is the very pulse of "Valkyrie," creating unrelenting tension and suspense, yet somehow artfully not getting in the way.  The score subliminally leads to a highly emotional ending, culminating in an incredibly moving climax, leaving test audiences in tears.  At times atmospherically restrained, and at others rousing, the score to "Valkyrie" is not one that can be categorized.  Once again, Ottman provides an intelligent and refreshing voice, continuing to raise the bar in the art of scoring films.   

"Valkyrie" is a true story that takes place during the height of WWII. A group of high-ranking German officers hatch a plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, and seize power of the military command in order to end the war. The operation was code named "Valkyrie", for the emergency plan that was meant to be used in case of a revolt against the Nazi government.

Having also scored "X-Men 2" and "Fantastic Four," Ottman is quickly becoming a musical voice for superheroes. For the Man of Steel, he wrote nearly two hours of score music for the adventure epic. As a tribute to fellow composer John Williams, Ottman incorporated about fifteen minutes of his original 1978 score into the film.

His editing on "The Usual Suspects" won him the British Academy Award and a nomination from the A.C.E. (American Cinema Editors). His score for that film also won the Saturn Award. Ottman and Singer first began collaborating together at USC Film School on "Public Access," which won the Grand Jury Prize at the 1993 Sundance Film Festival.

Since then, Ottman has composed the music for such diverse films the recent "Kiss Kiss Bang Bang," the thrillers "Hide and Seek," "Cellular," and "Gothika," and the dark comedy "The Cable Guy" with Ben Stiller. Although most recognized for film work, Ottman's score to Barry Sonnenfeld's "Fantasy Island" garnered an Emmy Award nomination.